New York Time Best Sellers Blog

 


A Critic of Technology Turns Her Gaze Inward

 

Sherry Turkle is best known for exploring the dysfunctional relationships between humans and their screens. She takes on a new focus — herself — in her memoir, “The Empathy Diaries.”

What Happens When a Publisher Becomes a Megapublisher?

 

The merger of Penguin Random House and Simon & Schuster has the potential to touch every part of the industry, including how much authors get paid and how bookstores are run.

16 New Books to Watch For in March

 

Long-awaited novels from Kazuo Ishiguro, Imbolo Mbue and Viet Thanh Nguyen, a publishing-house caper, Stephen King’s latest and more.

Memoir by Amos Oz’s Daughter Divides Family and Shocks Israel

 

“He told me I was filth,” Galia Oz writes in her book, “Something Disguised as Love,” among other accusations of physical and emotional abuse. Her mother and siblings have defended their late father.

Writing About Illness Without Platitudes

 

Suleika Jaouad talks about “Between Two Kingdoms,” and Jason Zinoman discusses great memoirs by comedians.

'Singled Out: The True Story of Glenn Burke' by Andrew Maraniss: An Excerpt

 

An excerpt from a new book that examines the vibrant life, and untimely death, of Glenn Burke, baseball’s first openly gay player.

Aliens, Book Organizing Tricks and Other Letters to the Editor

 

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.

New in Paperback: ‘Real Life’ and ‘A Game of Birds and Wolves’

 

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.

Murder, Mayhem and Menace: New Crime Fiction

 

In these novels, bodies disappear, swallowed by sinkholes and forests.

His Debut Novel Won the Pulitzer. Now It Has an Action-Packed Sequel.

 

In “The Committed,” a follow-up to “The Sympathizer,” Viet Thanh Nguyen’s nameless spy navigates a Paris underworld rife with drug deals, violence and colonialism’s ghosts.

5 Picture Books About the Wonders of Science

 

Fossils, flowers, galaxies and a rare “lefty” snail.

13 Y.A. Books to Add to Your Reading List This Spring

 

A retelling of “The Great Gatsby,” a healer fighting for her freedom and more: Here are 13 upcoming Y.A. titles you won’t want to miss this spring.

12 New Books We Recommend This Week

 

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.

Poem: A New Day Dawns

 

A poem that makes you wonder: How is it a flag can divide and unite a people?

Searching for Our Urban Future in the Ruins of the Past

 

In “Four Lost Cities,” Annalee Newitz explores the fates of four cities lost to time to better understand what leads urban environments to decay.

To Light Up a Dark Time, Effervescent Poems of New York City

 

Alex Dimitrov’s third collection, “Love and Other Poems,” delivers a burst of energy and a happy reminder of Frank O’Hara’s work.

Ibram X. Kendi Likes to Read at Bedtime

 

“I don’t remember the last time the pages of a book were not the final thing I saw before departing off for sleep.”

This Indigenous Author and Artist Team Have an Important Message

 

Carole Lindstrom and Michaela Goade collaborated on “We Are Water Protectors.” The rest is history.

A Writer Shakes Her Family Tree, and Cherishes Every Leaf

 

Maria Stepanova’s “In Memory of Memory” looks to the lives of her ancestors, and celebrates their very “ordinariness.”

In ‘Summer Brother,’ Sibling Bonding During a Season of Turmoil

 

In Jaap Robben’s “Summer Brother,” a 13-year-old finds himself the default caregiver for his severely disabled brother. His dad’s a swindler. The bills are due. Disaster is inevitable.

Why Baseball Is Obsessed With the Book 'Thinking, Fast and Slow'

 

A psychology book by a Nobel Prize-winning author has become a must-read in front offices. It is changing the sport.

He Planted a Bomb That Never Went Off. He Was Executed Anyway.

 

“Tomorrow They Won’t Dare to Murder Us,” by Joseph Andras, revisits a thorny episode in the Algerian war of independence.

It’s Tom Stoppard’s World and We Don’t Live in It

 

The playwright David Ives reviews Hermione Lee’s latest biography, “Tom Stoppard,” which meticulously recounts an extraordinary life.

Book Review: ‘The Sum of Us,’ by Heather McGhee

 

Heather McGhee’s compassionate but cleareyed book argues that divide-and-conquer tactics have left all Americans worse off.

Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Poet Who Nurtured the Beats, Dies at 101

 

An unapologetic proponent of “poetry as insurgent art,” he was also a publisher and the owner of the celebrated San Francisco bookstore City Lights.

Book Review: ‘Klara and the Sun,’ by Kazuo Ishiguro

 

“Klara and the Sun,” the eighth novel by the Nobel laureate, portrays a near future of sinister portent, in which artificial intelligence has encroached on every sphere of human existence.

Hillary Clinton and Louise Penny to Write Political Thriller

 

“State of Terror,” set for release in October, is about a secretary of state confronting terrorism threats and a weakened nation.

Pigeons: Nuisance Animals, or Expert Accomplices in Diamond Smuggling?

 

In “Flight of the Diamond Smugglers,” Matthew Gavin Frank details the surprising role pigeons play in South African diamond smuggling.

‘The Smash-Up,’ by Ali Benjamin: An Excerpt

 

An excerpt from “The Smash-Up,” by Ali Benjamin

Kazuo Ishiguro Sees What the Future Is Doing to Us

 

With his new novel, the Nobel Prize-winner reaffirms himself as our most profound observer of human fragility in the technological era.

Rage Sets a Couple on a Collision Course. Who Will Absorb the Impact?

 

In her new novel, “The Smash-Up,” Ali Benjamin takes readers on an exhilarating ride through a crisis propelled by real-life events.

The Merit, Thrills, Boredom and Fear of Police Work

 

“Tangled Up in Blue,” by Rosa Brooks, and “We Own This City,” by Justin Fenton, take readers inside two police forces (in Washington and Baltimore) to examine a complicated culture.

The Life of a Soldier

 

New books look at what it was like to be in the Roman military 2,000 years ago and in the American military today.

A Drug-Fueled New York City Bacchanal and the Lives It Changed

 

The protagonist of Jack Livings’s novel, “The Blizzard Party,” recalls the late-1970s blowout bash in an Upper West Side penthouse that marked her and her family forever.

They Were Black. Their Parents Were White. Growing Up Was Complicated.

 

“Raceless,” by Georgina Lawton, and “Surviving The White Gaze,” by Rebecca Carroll, follow two Black women who discover their racial identity after a childhood separated from their heritage.

Book Review: ‘Animal, Vegetable, Junk,’ by Mark Bittman

 

In “Animal, Vegetable, Junk,” Mark Bittman tells the long, unfolding story of our food sources, tracking the shift from agriculture to agribusiness.

Ibram X. Kendi Likes to Read at Bedtime

 

“I don’t remember the last time the pages of a book were not the final thing I saw before departing off for sleep.”

This Indigenous Author and Artist Team Have an Important Message

 

Carole Lindstrom and Michaela Goade collaborated on “We Are Water Protectors.” The rest is history.

Two Memoirists Explore Abuse and Survival

 

Tanya Selvaratnam and Vanessa Springora both survived powerful, manipulative men. Now they’re telling their tales.

Book Review: ‘Klara and the Sun,’ by Kazuo Ishiguro

 

“Klara and the Sun,” the eighth novel by the Nobel laureate, portrays a near future of sinister portent, in which artificial intelligence has encroached on every sphere of human existence.

A Drug-Fueled New York City Bacchanal and the Lives It Changed

 

The protagonist of Jack Livings’s novel, “The Blizzard Party,” recalls the late-1970s blowout bash in an Upper West Side penthouse that marked her and her family forever.

Writing About Illness Without Platitudes

 

Suleika Jaouad talks about “Between Two Kingdoms,” and Jason Zinoman discusses great memoirs by comedians.

11 New Books We Recommend This Week

 

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.

The Merit, Thrills, Boredom and Fear of Police Work

 

“Tangled Up in Blue,” by Rosa Brooks, and “We Own This City,” by Justin Fenton, take readers inside two police forces (in Washington and Baltimore) to examine a complicated culture.

Rage Sets a Couple on a Collision Course. Who Will Absorb the Impact?

 

In her new novel, “The Smash-Up,” Ali Benjamin takes readers on an exhilarating ride through a crisis propelled by real-life events.

When Silver Linings Don’t Cut It, Honesty Helps

 

When Suleika Jaouad was 22, she learned she had leukemia. In her memoir, “Between Two Kingdoms,” she looks back on what got her through.

The Most Serious Security Risk Facing the United States

 

Nicole Perlroth’s “This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends” looks at the history of cyberattacks and why they are only likely to get worse.

Electrons, Photons, Gluons, Quarks: A Nobel-Winning Physicist Explains It All

 

In “Fundamentals,” Frank Wilczek describes his own love for physics and details what we all need to understand about the forces that shape our physical world.

Aliens, Book Organizing Tricks and Other Letters to the Editor

 

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.

New in Paperback: ‘Real Life’ and ‘A Game of Birds and Wolves’

 

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.

Murder, Mayhem and Menace: New Crime Fiction

 

In these novels, bodies disappear, swallowed by sinkholes and forests.

His Debut Novel Won the Pulitzer. Now It Has an Action-Packed Sequel.

 

In “The Committed,” a follow-up to “The Sympathizer,” Viet Thanh Nguyen’s nameless spy navigates a Paris underworld rife with drug deals, violence and colonialism’s ghosts.

5 Picture Books About the Wonders of Science

 

Fossils, flowers, galaxies and a rare “lefty” snail.

12 New Books We Recommend This Week

 

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.

Searching for Our Urban Future in the Ruins of the Past

 

In “Four Lost Cities,” Annalee Newitz explores the fates of four cities lost to time to better understand what leads urban environments to decay.

To Light Up a Dark Time, Effervescent Poems of New York City

 

Alex Dimitrov’s third collection, “Love and Other Poems,” delivers a burst of energy and a happy reminder of Frank O’Hara’s work.

In ‘Summer Brother,’ Sibling Bonding During a Season of Turmoil

 

In Jaap Robben’s “Summer Brother,” a 13-year-old finds himself the default caregiver for his severely disabled brother. His dad’s a swindler. The bills are due. Disaster is inevitable.

He Planted a Bomb That Never Went Off. He Was Executed Anyway.

 

“Tomorrow They Won’t Dare to Murder Us,” by Joseph Andras, revisits a thorny episode in the Algerian war of independence.

It’s Tom Stoppard’s World and We Don’t Live in It

 

The playwright David Ives reviews Hermione Lee’s latest biography, “Tom Stoppard,” which meticulously recounts an extraordinary life.

Pigeons: Nuisance Animals, or Expert Accomplices in Diamond Smuggling?

 

In “Flight of the Diamond Smugglers,” Matthew Gavin Frank details the surprising role pigeons play in South African diamond smuggling.

‘The Smash-Up,’ by Ali Benjamin: An Excerpt

 

An excerpt from “The Smash-Up,” by Ali Benjamin

The Life of a Soldier

 

New books look at what it was like to be in the Roman military 2,000 years ago and in the American military today.

They Were Black. Their Parents Were White. Growing Up Was Complicated.

 

“Raceless,” by Georgina Lawton, and “Surviving The White Gaze,” by Rebecca Carroll, follow two Black women who discover their racial identity after a childhood separated from their heritage.

True Crime Gets Its Close-Up

 

In “Two Truths and a Lie,” “Confident Women” and “The Officer’s Daughter,” readers feel the aftershocks of felonies and malfeasances.

New & Noteworthy, From Isabel Allende to Robert Walser

 

A selection of recent titles of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.

Growing Up With a Revolution, and a Mystic Grandmother

 

“The Bone Fire,” by Gyorgy Dragoman, follows a 13-year-old girl as she navigates political upheaval and an uncanny world.

Chasing Down a Deadbeat Dad, With a Knife Strapped to Her Leg

 

“The Slaughterman’s Daughter,” by Yaniv Iczkovits, is a sprawling 19th-century quest narrative set in czarist Russia.

Kindred Spirits: 2 Collections of Native Mythology for Children and Their Adults

 

In “Ancestor Approved” and “The Sea-Ringed World,” sacred stories provide comfort by bringing people together.

 

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