New York Time Best Sellers Blog

 


Booker Prize Longlist Is Unveiled

 

Rachel Cusk’s “Second Place,” Richard Powers’s “Bewilderment” and Kazuo Ishiguro’s “Klara and the Sun” are among the 13 novels nominated for one of the world’s most prestigious literary awards.

The Extraordinary History (and Likely Busy Future) of Quarantine

 

“Until Proven Safe,” by Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley, is about the lifesaving measure that has also been abused for political purposes over the centuries.

A Son of Gabriel García Márquez Tenderly Recalls His Parents

 

In “A Farewell to Gabo and Mercedes,” Rodrigo Garcia chronicles his parents’ final days, including his celebrated father’s struggle with dementia and his mother’s fierce independence to the end.

‘A Storm Waiting to Happen’: A Colombian Writer Watches His Home From Afar

 

Juan Gabriel Vásquez sees his new story collection, “Songs for the Flames,” as part of a thriving literary landscape in Colombia because, he said, “places in conflict produce fiction.”

A Rising Star’s Career Was Cut Short. His Impact Is Just Beginning.

 

Anthony Veasna So died before the release of his first book, “Afterparties,” but his loved ones, mentors and newfound fans are making it a particularly significant debut.

A Heartbreaking Novel About Mothers, Daughters and Secrets

 

Elisabeth Egan talks about Esther Freud’s “I Couldn’t Love You More,” and Philip D’Anieri discusses “The Appalachian Trail.”

Sally Miller Gearhart, Lesbian Writer and Activist, Dies at 90

 

She fought anti-gay policies alongside Harvey Milk, wrote influential books, including science fiction, and founded a women-only refuge in the woods.

The Enduring Whimsy and Wonderment of Eric Carle

 

The beloved children’s author and illustrator died in May. But his irrepressible spirit lives on in his books.

What to Do This Weekend

 

Tomatoes and tiny travel.

New in Paperback: ‘Transcendent Kingdom’ and ‘Agent Sonya’

 

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.

What Makes Elon Musk Different

 

Two new books, Eric Berger’s “Liftoff” and Tim Higgins’s “Power Play,” explore Musk’s terrestrial and extraterrestrial pursuits — and what has made him so successful.

Make a Splash: 8 Summer Picture Books Take You to the Water

 

Dip into these picture books about pools and beaches, swimming and sailing, calm waters and stormy seas.

Advertisements for the Otherworldy

 

In the 1940s and ’50s the Book Review’s pages were full of ads for books on the extraterrestrial and dystopian.

11 New Books We Recommend This Week

 

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.

Barack Obama and Bruce Springsteen's Podcast to Become a Book

 

Crown is publishing “Renegades: Born in the USA,” a book adaptation of the podcast conversations.

Poem: The Woman You Love Cuts Apples for You

 

Reading Rosal’s poem again made me pull out some tajin, and slice some apples, and remember how poems create a heart’s history and remind us of home.

The Promise and Tragedy of a Utopian Community, as Seen by One of Its Own

 

“Better to Have Gone,” by Akash Kapur, recounts the haunting, heartbreaking history of Auroville, an intentional community in southern India where he and his wife were raised.

Laura Dave Turned the Scorned Wife Into a ‘Hero’

 

In her best-selling thriller, “The Last Thing He Told Me,” a Silicon Valley wife learns the truth about her missing husband.

Eddie Glaude Jr., an Expert on James Baldwin, Reveals His Favorite Baldwin Book

 

Glaude, the author of “Begin Again,” says that “No Name in the Street” (1972) “tries to offer an account of what happened between Little Rock, Dr. King’s assassination and the emergence of Black Power. Trauma and wound saturate his sentences, and his memory fails him in places. It is a masterpiece at the level of form and substance.”

Readers Have Some Thoughts About Recent Reviews and Essays

 

Here’s a peek into the Book Review’s mailbag.

How to Follow the Olympics

 

Starting now.

Scents and Science Mingle in ‘The Joy of Sweat’

 

In her illuminating new book, Sarah Everts offers a guide to the necessity and virtues of perspiration.

Carol Easton, Biographer of Arts Figures, Dies at 87

 

Curious about creativity, she chronicled the lives of Agnes de Mille, Jacqueline du Pré, Samuel Goldwyn and Stan Kenton.

To Battle Climate Change, Begin With Your Air-Conditioner

 

In “After Cooling,” Eric Dean Wilson explores the ways that temperature-controlled environments contribute to the climate crisis.

Revisiting a Utopian City With Fondness and Fury

 

In “Better to Have Gone,” Akash Kapur writes about Auroville, a community in India founded by a Frenchwoman, where Kapur grew up and met his future wife.

New & Noteworthy, From El Chapo to a Holocaust Survivor’s Art

 

A selection of recent titles of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.

‘Virtue,’ by Hermione Hoby: An Excerpt

 

An excerpt from “Virtue,” by Hermione Hoby

‘What Strange Paradise,’ by Omar El Akkad: An Excerpt

 

An excerpt from “What Strange Paradise,” by Omar El Akkad

Book Review: ‘What Strange Paradise,’ by Omar El Akkad

 

Omar El Akkad’s new novel follows a young refugee who survives a shipwreck and the girl who comes to his aid.

In These Debut Novels, Young Women Feel Oppressed by Womanhood

 

A trapped mom turns into an angry dog by night, an atheist lesbian poses as a Catholic receptionist, a 20-year-old woman suffers through domestic abuse.

Hermione Hoby Takes on Virtue-Signaling

 

In her new novel, “Virtue,” a white, liberal 20-something is torn between elitism and activism.

Katie Kitamura Translates the Untranslatable

 

In “Intimacies,” a court interpreter at The Hague grapples with the ethics of the world around her.

A Writer’s Struggle, an Affair and a Pot of Cash Converge in a Novel

 

In Pedro Mairal’s “The Woman From Uruguay,” a plan to smuggle some money into Argentina goes disastrously awry.

A Fresh Look at the Family Who Led (and Lost) Britain’s War for America

 

“The Howe Dynasty,” by Julie Flavell, adds nuance and complexity to the story of a famous English military family by examining the extensive correspondence of one of its female members.

A Trek Across Florida, Braving Deadly Swamps and Bounty Hunters

 

In John Brandon’s new novel, “Ivory Shoals,” a boy in post-Civil War Florida searches for the father he has never met.

The Enduring Whimsy and Wonderment of Eric Carle

 

The beloved children’s author and illustrator died in May. But his irrepressible spirit lives on in his books.

A Son of Gabriel García Márquez Tenderly Recalls His Parents

 

In “A Farewell to Gabo and Mercedes,” Rodrigo Garcia chronicles his parents’ final days, including his celebrated father’s struggle with dementia and his mother’s fierce independence to the end.

What Makes Elon Musk Different

 

Two new books, Eric Berger’s “Liftoff” and Tim Higgins’s “Power Play,” explore Musk’s terrestrial and extraterrestrial pursuits — and what has made him so successful.

In ‘The Council of Animals,’ the Fate of Humanity Comes Down to a Vote

 

In Nick McDonell’s new novel, humans are almost extinct. Now the animal kingdom must decide their fate.

Hermione Hoby Takes on Virtue-Signaling

 

In her new novel, “Virtue,” a white, liberal 20-something is torn between elitism and activism.

A Fresh Look at the Family Who Led (and Lost) Britain’s War for America

 

“The Howe Dynasty,” by Julie Flavell, adds nuance and complexity to the story of a famous English military family by examining the extensive correspondence of one of its female members.

A Heartbreaking Novel About Mothers, Daughters and Secrets

 

Elisabeth Egan talks about Esther Freud’s “I Couldn’t Love You More,” and Philip D’Anieri discusses “The Appalachian Trail.”

11 New Books We Recommend This Week

 

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.

Eddie Glaude Jr., an Expert on James Baldwin, Reveals His Favorite Baldwin Book

 

Glaude, the author of “Begin Again,” says that “No Name in the Street” (1972) “tries to offer an account of what happened between Little Rock, Dr. King’s assassination and the emergence of Black Power. Trauma and wound saturate his sentences, and his memory fails him in places. It is a masterpiece at the level of form and substance.”

Laura Dave Turned the Scorned Wife Into a ‘Hero’

 

In her best-selling thriller, “The Last Thing He Told Me,” a Silicon Valley wife learns the truth about her missing husband.

Book Review: ‘What Strange Paradise,’ by Omar El Akkad

 

Omar El Akkad’s new novel follows a young refugee who survives a shipwreck and the girl who comes to his aid.

To Battle Climate Change, Begin With Your Air-Conditioner

 

In “After Cooling,” Eric Dean Wilson explores the ways that temperature-controlled environments contribute to the climate crisis.

Tracking ‘Strange Beasts of China’ With Booze, Smokes and Sleuthing

 

Set in a fictional Chinese city, Yan Ge’s novel features a bestiary of mysterious creatures and a cryptozoologist narrator who is trying to study and classify them.

New in Paperback: ‘Transcendent Kingdom’ and ‘Agent Sonya’

 

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.

Make a Splash: 8 Summer Picture Books Take You to the Water

 

Dip into these picture books about pools and beaches, swimming and sailing, calm waters and stormy seas.

The Promise and Tragedy of a Utopian Community, as Seen by One of Its Own

 

“Better to Have Gone,” by Akash Kapur, recounts the haunting, heartbreaking history of Auroville, an intentional community in southern India where he and his wife were raised.

Readers Have Some Thoughts About Recent Reviews and Essays

 

Here’s a peek into the Book Review’s mailbag.

New & Noteworthy, From El Chapo to a Holocaust Survivor’s Art

 

A selection of recent titles of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.

‘Virtue,’ by Hermione Hoby: An Excerpt

 

An excerpt from “Virtue,” by Hermione Hoby

‘What Strange Paradise,’ by Omar El Akkad: An Excerpt

 

An excerpt from “What Strange Paradise,” by Omar El Akkad

In These Debut Novels, Young Women Feel Oppressed by Womanhood

 

A trapped mom turns into an angry dog by night, an atheist lesbian poses as a Catholic receptionist, a 20-year-old woman suffers through domestic abuse.

Katie Kitamura Translates the Untranslatable

 

In “Intimacies,” a court interpreter at The Hague grapples with the ethics of the world around her.

A Writer’s Struggle, an Affair and a Pot of Cash Converge in a Novel

 

In Pedro Mairal’s “The Woman From Uruguay,” a plan to smuggle some money into Argentina goes disastrously awry.

A Trek Across Florida, Braving Deadly Swamps and Bounty Hunters

 

In John Brandon’s new novel, “Ivory Shoals,” a boy in post-Civil War Florida searches for the father he has never met.

 

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