New York Time Best Sellers Blog

 


Hilary Mantel, Prize-Winning Author Known for ‘Wolf Hall,’ Dies at 70

 

The two-time Booker Prize-winning author was known for “Wolf Hall” and two other novels based on the life of Thomas Cromwell.

What Hemingway Left in Sloppy Joe’s Bar 80 Years Ago

 

The trove of items deposited in Key West, now part of a new archive at Penn State, includes four unpublished short stories, drafts of manuscripts and boxes of personal effects.

Hilary Mantel Stared Down Her Past, and the World’s, With Steely Resolve

 

Hilary Mantel brought great precision to her writing, and asked the same of us in our reading.

7 Audiobooks to Listen to Now

 

Nick Cave, religious cults and a dead mother-in-law who may or may not have come back to life: immersive narratives to download this month.

Historical Novels With a Few Tricks Up Their Sleeves

 

Special powers, avian obsession and visions of the future fuel these transporting and entertaining tales.

Book Review: ‘Stay True: A Memoir,” by Hua Hsu

 

In “Stay True,” Hua Hsu, a staff writer for The New Yorker, recounts his relationship with an Asian American college friend, whose search for identity quietly shaped the author’s own.

Review: ‘Mr. Wilder and Me,’ by Jonathan Coe

 

Jonathan Coe’s novel “Mr. Wilder and Me” explores the late career of a legendary Hollywood director.

Review: ‘I Fear My Pain Interests You,’ by Stephanie LaCava

 

In Stephanie LaCava’s novel “I Fear My Pain Interests You,” a young actress manages the strains of family and failed romance.

In ‘The Furrows,’ Namwali Serpell Confronts a Sibling’s Disappearance

 

Confronting sudden loss in her own life, Namwali Serpell has written “The Furrows,” a disquieting portrait of the human mind, warped by grief.

Book Review: ‘Shrines of Gaiety,’ by Kate Atkinson

 

In this fizzy picaresque, the novelist conjures a London coming alive after World War I, where a nightclub empire offers refuge — and hides secrets.

The Life and Times of Jann Wenner and Rolling Stone

 

Joe Hagan discusses “Sticky Fingers,” his 2017 biography of Wenner, and a panel of Times critics talks about their 2019 list of outstanding memoirs.

Irwin Glusker, 98, Dies; Gave American Heritage Its Distinctive Look

 

A veteran art director, he was best known for his work at the lavish magazine of U.S. history that became a fixture in dens across the country.

New Crime Fiction

 

In Alaina Urquhart’s serial-killer thriller “The Butcher and the Wren,” a Louisiana forensic pathologist matches wits with a murderer.

Hilary Mantel Books, Reviews and Interviews: A Reading Guide

 

Mantel’s body of work spanned memoir, short stories, essays — and, of course, historical fiction. Here’s a guide to her writing.

Harvey Awards to Induct New Hall of Fame Members

 

Neil Gaiman, Marjorie Henderson Buell, Gilbert Shelton and Roy Thomas will be honored for their comic book work at New York Comic Con on Oct. 7.

Review: “The Wind Rises” (Alma, Book 1) by Timothée de Fombelle

 

A West African girl thrust from her family’s private Eden confronts awful truths on the high seas in Timothée de Fombelle’s “The Wind Rises.”

Review: “The Door of No Return” by Kwame Alexander

 

In his new novel-in-verse, “The Door of No Return,” the Newbery Medal-winning author works hard to show that white people weren’t the only ones perpetuating an unjust system.

12 New Books We Recommend This Week

 

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.

Deanna Raybourn Puts Power in the Hands of Older Women

 

In “Killers of a Certain Age,” the longtime historical novelist dips a toe in contemporary waters — and celebrates an oft-ignored age group.

Andrew Sean Greer By the Book Interview

 

“I couldn’t read more than a page of ‘Last of the Mohicans,’” says the novelist, whose new book is “Less Is Lost.” “Not only is it wildly offensive, it’s unintelligible gibberish. There. I said it. Come after me.”

Book Review: ‘Our Missing Hearts,’ by Celeste Ng

 

“Our Missing Hearts” explores a fictional world where Chinese Americans are spurned and books are recycled into toilet paper.

Saul Kripke, Philosopher Who Found Truths in Semantics, Dies at 81

 

A leading 20th-century thinker, he published a landmark work at 32. Known for lecturing extemporaneously without notes, he dazzled colleagues with the breadth of his ruminations.

Springfield, Missouri, Is Their Muse

 

Working in their home city, the photographer Julie Blackmon and her daughter, Stella, a filmmaker, find some mystery in everyday life.

John Train, Paris Review Co-Founder and Cold War Operative, Dies at 94

 

His career, ranging from literature to finance to war, and from France to Afghanistan, seemed to cover every interest and issue of his exalted social class.

Book Review: ‘The Story of Russia’ by Orlando Figes

 

In a new book, the historian Orlando Figes argues that the war on Ukraine is only the latest instance of a nation twisting the past to justify its future.

Book Review: ‘Self-Portrait With Ghost,’ by Meng Jin; ‘Tomorrow in Shanghai,’ by May-lee Chai; ‘A Catalog of Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On,’ by Dung Kai-cheung

 

Stories set in China, the U.S. and Hong Kong are deadpan, dysfunctional, sentimental — and weird.

Book Review: ‘By Hands Now Known,” by Margaret A. Burnham

 

“By Hands Now Known,” by Margaret A. Burnham, examines the chronic, quotidian violence faced by Black citizens in the American South — and the law’s failure to address it.

In ‘Joyce’s Women,’ 2 Great Irish Writers Square Up

 

Edna O’Brien’s latest stage work, at the Abbey Theater in Dublin, imagines the inner lives of important female figures around James Joyce.

Newly Published, From Neuron Forests to Cryptocurrency

 

A selection of recently published books.

John W. O’Malley, Leading Catholic Historian, Dies at 95

 

He wrote groundbreaking histories of the Second Vatican Council, the late medieval church and the Jesuits, of which he was a member.

Jasmine Guillory Finds Her Happily-Ever-After as a Romance Writer

 

After leaving a law career to focus on fiction full-time, Jasmine Guillory is publishing her eighth novel, “Drunk on Love.”

A Finnish Scholar Wants to Change How We See American History

 

In “Indigenous Continent,” Pekka Hamalainen aims to upend the nation’s grand narrative, putting Native people and Native power at the center.

‘Four Saints in Three Acts’ Review: An Opera Becomes a One-Man Show

 

The actor David Greenspan is a tour-de-force, taking on all the roles of Gertrude Stein and Virgil Thomson’s large-cast opera from 1934, sans music.

Spotify Makes a Bet on Audiobooks

 

The streaming service that transformed the music industry is expanding into audiobooks, and will offer more than 300,000 titles on a pay-per-book model.

Book Review: ‘Lady Justice,’ by Dahlia Lithwick

 

In “Lady Justice,” Dahlia Lithwick celebrates the female lawyers, judges and others who stood up to the administration.

Book Review: ‘Our Missing Hearts,’ by Celeste Ng

 

“Our Missing Hearts” explores a fictional world where Chinese Americans are spurned and books are recycled into toilet paper.

The Essential Judy Blume

 

For 50 years, her books have educated, entertained and connected young readers. Whether you want to revisit a classic or inspire a new fan, here’s what to read.

Book Review: “Less Is Lost,” by Andrew Sean Greer

 

In “Less Is Lost,” the sequel to his Pulitzer Prize-winning comic novel, the author’s writer protagonist, now over 50 and in need of cash, takes to the road once again.

Review: ‘We Are the Proud Boys,’ by Andy Campbell

 

Andy Campbell details the history of an ascendant far-right group.

Book Review: “The Book of Goose,” by Yiyun Li

 

In “The Book of Goose,” a literary hoax devised by two teenagers closes the distance between fiction and reality.

Book Review: “Lucy by the Sea,” by Elizabeth Strout

 

In “Lucy by the Sea,” Elizabeth Strout relocates a formerly married couple from Manhattan to Maine at the peak of the Covid pandemic.

New Psychological Thrillers

 

In Deanna Raybourn’s “Killers of a Certain Age,” four female assassins, celebrating their retirement after 40-year careers, discover they’ve been marked for death.

Andrea Barrett By the Book Interview

 

“Luckily,” says the novelist and story writer, whose new book is the collection “Natural History,” “the kind librarian at the local Bookmobile let us take any books we could reach (I was ridiculously tall).”

10 New Books We Recommend This Week

 

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.

How Does a Married Couple Write Books Together?

 

Behind the best-selling novelist Ilona Andrews are two people who live, work, lift weights and take care of their pets under the same roof.

Book Review: ‘Flush,’ by Bryn Nelson

 

A comprehensive study of human waste explores the possibilities for global health, inside every flush.

My Life in Error

 

A copy editor recounts his obsession with perfection.

Review: ‘Catholicism: A Global History From the French Revolution to Pope Francis,’ by John T. McGreevy

 

John T. McGreevy’s exhaustive “Catholicism: A Global History From the French Revolution to Pope Francis” explains how debates within the church got so fierce.

Historical Novels With a Few Tricks Up Their Sleeves

 

Special powers, avian obsession and visions of the future fuel these transporting and entertaining tales.

Book Review: ‘Stay True: A Memoir,” by Hua Hsu

 

In “Stay True,” Hua Hsu, a staff writer for The New Yorker, recounts his relationship with an Asian American college friend, whose search for identity quietly shaped the author’s own.

Review: ‘Mr. Wilder and Me,’ by Jonathan Coe

 

Jonathan Coe’s novel “Mr. Wilder and Me” explores the late career of a legendary Hollywood director.

Review: ‘I Fear My Pain Interests You,’ by Stephanie LaCava

 

In Stephanie LaCava’s novel “I Fear My Pain Interests You,” a young actress manages the strains of family and failed romance.

Book Review: ‘Shrines of Gaiety,’ by Kate Atkinson

 

In this fizzy picaresque, the novelist conjures a London coming alive after World War I, where a nightclub empire offers refuge — and hides secrets.

Hilary Mantel Stared Down Her Past, and the World’s, With Steely Resolve

 

Hilary Mantel brought great precision to her writing, and asked the same of us in our reading.

The Life and Times of Jann Wenner and Rolling Stone

 

Joe Hagan discusses “Sticky Fingers,” his 2017 biography of Wenner, and a panel of Times critics talks about their 2019 list of outstanding memoirs.

New Crime Fiction

 

In Alaina Urquhart’s serial-killer thriller “The Butcher and the Wren,” a Louisiana forensic pathologist matches wits with a murderer.

7 Audiobooks to Listen to Now

 

Nick Cave, religious cults and a dead mother-in-law who may or may not have come back to life: immersive narratives to download this month.

Review: “The Wind Rises” (Alma, Book 1) by Timothée de Fombelle

 

A West African girl thrust from her family’s private Eden confronts awful truths on the high seas in Timothée de Fombelle’s “The Wind Rises.”

Review: “The Door of No Return” by Kwame Alexander

 

In his new novel-in-verse, “The Door of No Return,” the Newbery Medal-winning author works hard to show that white people weren’t the only ones perpetuating an unjust system.

12 New Books We Recommend This Week

 

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.

Deanna Raybourn Puts Power in the Hands of Older Women

 

In “Killers of a Certain Age,” the longtime historical novelist dips a toe in contemporary waters — and celebrates an oft-ignored age group.

Andrew Sean Greer By the Book Interview

 

“I couldn’t read more than a page of ‘Last of the Mohicans,’” says the novelist, whose new book is “Less Is Lost.” “Not only is it wildly offensive, it’s unintelligible gibberish. There. I said it. Come after me.”

Book Review: ‘The Story of Russia’ by Orlando Figes

 

In a new book, the historian Orlando Figes argues that the war on Ukraine is only the latest instance of a nation twisting the past to justify its future.

Book Review: ‘Self-Portrait With Ghost,’ by Meng Jin; ‘Tomorrow in Shanghai,’ by May-lee Chai; ‘A Catalog of Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made On,’ by Dung Kai-cheung

 

Stories set in China, the U.S. and Hong Kong are deadpan, dysfunctional, sentimental — and weird.

Book Review: ‘By Hands Now Known,” by Margaret A. Burnham

 

“By Hands Now Known,” by Margaret A. Burnham, examines the chronic, quotidian violence faced by Black citizens in the American South — and the law’s failure to address it.

Newly Published, From Neuron Forests to Cryptocurrency

 

A selection of recently published books.

Book Review: ‘Lady Justice,’ by Dahlia Lithwick

 

In “Lady Justice,” Dahlia Lithwick celebrates the female lawyers, judges and others who stood up to the administration.

Book Review: ‘You’ve Been Played,’ by Adrian Hon

 

In “You’ve Been Played,” a self-identified gamer warns against the dangers of imposing artificial incentives on all aspects of our lives.

Review: ‘A System So Magnificent It Is Blinding,’ by Amanda Svensson

 

Three siblings reunite in Amanda Svensson’s turbulent novel “A System So Magnificent It Is Blinding.”

 

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